Breast MRI Guided Core Needle Biopsy

Breast MRI guided core needle biopsy is a procedure using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as guidance for needle placement to obtain tissue from a suspicious area in the breast seen only by MRI.

Images are initially obtained in a fashion similar to the diagnostic breast MRI, using intravenous contrast. Unlike the diagnostic MRI, the images are obtained with the breast(s) of concern in some compression from side to side, with a biopsy guiding grid in place. The grid is used in conjunction with a highly sophisticated computer program to provide guidance for needle placement.

Using sterile technique, the skin and deeper tissues are numbed using a thin numbing needle. A small incision (cut) is made in the skin to allow biopsy needle access to the area of concern. Tissue is obtained with the biopsy needle and sent for pathological evaluation. The pathology results are usually available the next day.

After the tissue samples are obtained, a tiny titanium marker is placed in the breast at the biopsy site. This will act as a guide for the surgeon if surgical removal of the area in question is indicated based on the pathology results. If no surgery is required, the marker stays in place. It cannot be felt, does not interact with the body in any way, will not set off metal detectors and will not prevent future MRI examinations.

Following the procedure, a post-procedure mammogram is obtained at the Breast Center of Greensboro Imaging to confirm appropriate location of the titanium marker.

For 24 hours following the biopsy, limited physical activity is recommended to prevent post-biopsy bleeding. Driving is allowed immediately following the biopsy.